Posts tagged technology
Introducing NEO, Innovant’s New High Performance Trading Desk

After galvanizing the market leadership position established with its FORm family, Innovant is proud to introduce its next-generation trading desk, NEO.

NEO trading desks are engineered to be height adjustable, but can be specified as fixed height. Day-2 conversion to adjustable height is a quick and simple process, saving clients time and money. Available in four standard configurations, NEO accommodates various CPU containment requirements. All four options feature sophisticated cable management, easy equipment installation or access, and state-of-the-art thermal management.

“NEO is a game changer. Its performance, features, and aesthetics set a new benchmark for trading desks,” explains Bruce Wells, Director of Marketing & Design at Innovant.

Incorporating the unparalleled quality and workmanship of all Innovant products, NEO boasts exceptional technology integration and aesthetics. NEO also offers the critical sustainability and wellness features required in today’s workplace. Bolstered by Innovant’s trademark excellence in tailoring and global manufacturing capabilities, NEO is boldly positioned to expand Innovant’s market leadership worldwide.

For more information about NEO, please visit http://www.innovantfurniture.com/neo.

About Innovant: Innovant is a renowned industry leader creating intelligent, adaptable furniture for the modern workplace. For over a quarter century, Innovant has proven itself the preeminent trading desk manufacturer of North America. More than half of the twenty largest global investment banks in the US consider Innovant their standard trading desk manufacturer. With a flagship showroom located in New York, Innovant maintains a worldwide network of offices and showrooms spanning North America, Europe and Asia.

Why Collaborating Online Is Sometimes Better than Face-to-Face

As published in the Harvard Business Review, online collaboration is not necessary a “second-best substitute for face-to-face work.” Instead, online communication can complement the collaboration process, offering its own perks and benefits.

Online collaboration not only helps bridge teams across different time zones and distances, it also facilitates speedy and efficient communication: “By solving time problems it creates the benefit of 24/7 production cycles; by solving distance problems it enables newly diverse teams; and by solving communication problems it lets us work together in ways that tap into a broader set of skills and capacities.”

To explore the perks and benefits of online collaboration, check out HBR’s article.

Workspaces that Move People

imageRecently published in the October issue of Harvard Business Review, the story, “Workspaces That Move People,“ promotes the strategic design of workplaces in order to “produce specific performance outcome[s].” The article’s authors suggest that companies analyzing performance metrics can understand how a “space’s design helps or hurts [employee] performance,” thereby gaining the following insights:

  1. Where and how you work define who you work with
  2. Who you work with drives group performance to a large extent
  3. Workspace performance metrics can now be mapped with organizational ones

With this knowledge in hand, companies are closer than ever to designing (and then continually redesigning) workspaces that actually help employees do their jobs, rather than struggle to do them. In order to gather the information needed to drive these designs and redesigns, the authors advocate for the deployment of sensors — in phones, in offices, or even worn around the neck — that collect the necessary breadth and depth of office data. With this data, employers and designers could begin understanding who should be working with whom, where, and why — a discovery that could hasten the end of the office as we know it.

By comparing the real-time data described above with such organizational metrics as "total sales or number of new product launches,” the authors argue that it is possible to “demonstrate a workspace’s effect on the bottom line.” With this connection established, companies could “engineer” their workspaces to improve overall performance.  

Though knowledge work has been confined to the office for almost a century, the article suggests that the emerging data may lead to the dispersion of organizations across cities – as with Zappos and the experimental “Downtown Project” in Las Vegas. The article also cites the “digital workspace” as a major consideration for design, given that technology hosts an ever-growing amount of knowledge work and idea-sharing.

The future of the workplace is a fluid as it is unknown. We look forward to moving with it in the directions suggested by the growing pool of performance metrics.

“ Evolution of the Desk ” is an initiative borne out of the Harvard Innovation Lab. The goal is to illustrate the impact that technology has had on our lives over the last 35 years. A cluttered desk, complete with a rolodex, a file cabinet, and a fax machine, transforms into a much cleaner, simpler surface consisting of only a laptop and a mobile phone. Of course, some things in life - like the sun - are everlasting, so the shades persist throughout the years.    All of the vintage items featured in this video are authentic. The Macintosh Classic, corded phone, fax machine, globe, corkboard, Polaroid camera, and rolodex were all purchased through individual sellers on Ebay. The radio was acquired from Goodwill, and the picture frame came from pictureframes.com. The rest of the items were found lying around in basements, storage units, and garage sales. And the sunglasses? Those were easy since we actually still own a pair.    How has your desktop changed over the years?         
  Content and video via  Best Reviews , image via  Gizmodo .

Evolution of the Desk” is an initiative borne out of the Harvard Innovation Lab. The goal is to illustrate the impact that technology has had on our lives over the last 35 years. A cluttered desk, complete with a rolodex, a file cabinet, and a fax machine, transforms into a much cleaner, simpler surface consisting of only a laptop and a mobile phone. Of course, some things in life - like the sun - are everlasting, so the shades persist throughout the years.

All of the vintage items featured in this video are authentic. The Macintosh Classic, corded phone, fax machine, globe, corkboard, Polaroid camera, and rolodex were all purchased through individual sellers on Ebay. The radio was acquired from Goodwill, and the picture frame came from pictureframes.com. The rest of the items were found lying around in basements, storage units, and garage sales. And the sunglasses? Those were easy since we actually still own a pair.

How has your desktop changed over the years?        

Content and video via Best Reviews, image via Gizmodo.

Innovant Launches FORm_AV, Revolutionary Video Conferencing Suite

imageFollowing 18 months of development in collaboration with some of the most prominent global tech giants, Innovant is proud to launch its FORm_AV Video Conferencing Suite.

“Designed in partnership with some of the world’s largest tech firms, Innovant’s FORm_AV products are particularly suited for high growth, global companies with intense video conferencing requirements.” – Bruce Wells, Director of Marketing & Development at Innovant

Video conferencing is rapidly expanding in the workplace, demanding more sophisticated, yet flexible solutions to accommodate this technology. Innovant offers an especially apt solution that eliminates the high construction costs of technology mounting and cable routing through floors and walls. With all cabling housed directly within the technology stand and accompanying conference tables, FORm_AV provides superior utility with zero disruption of the physical environment.

FORm_AV stands are also uniquely engineered to deliver high-capacity display support for either single or dual monitors (up to 80” wide). When configured with Innovant’s FORm_AV conference tables, the product creates a fully integrated conference AV platform that provides unparalleled flexibility and speed of assembly or relocation for the fast-changing conference environment.

FORm_AV conference tables (available in a variety of shapes and sizes) offer intelligent power & connectivity management and access for technology-intensive clients with special requirements. Desktop power, USB, laptop charging cords, and other connectivity options are all available through easy access panels in the tabletop. Standard desktop finishes include high pressure laminate and wood veneer with Innovant’s proprietary Greenlock™ finish (tailored materials available upon request).

Innovant’s FORm_AV Conferencing Suite epitomizes efficiency, balancing a minimalist aesthetic with the super strength of its function. Now available to customers, the product will be formally unveiled at Neocon 2014 in Chicago.

For more information about Innovant, FORm_AV or any other conference products, please visit http://www.innovant.com.

Part Two: Greg Lindsay on the Future of the Workplace

Earlier this summer, the marketing team attended an IIDANY Facilities Forum focused on the topic, “The Evolving Workplace: Change or Adapt?” Moderated by David Craig, Associate Principal at Cannon Design, the discussion featured insights on the evolving workplace and what this means for our industry from two workplace innovators, Greg Lindsay, Contributing Writer for Fast Company, and Bart Higgins, Director at ?What If!

Greg agreed to elaborate on some of his ideas for our blog, including explorations into what he calls “the blurring of the office and the city.” Read “Part One” of our interview here.

DH: You’ve written about Google and mentioned them at the IIDA event. Innovant has seen three global RFPs from them in the last four years, which is an extreme example of a company undergoing rapid growth at rapid speed. If you can speak to this, how do such companies deal with the chaos of space planning, workplace strategy, and establishing standards under these conditions?

GL: As a journalist, I’ve never been on the inside of such hyper-growth, so I can’t really speak to that. However, I am fascinated that the biggest cloud company in the universe is massively investing in physical space. The second Googleplex (i.e. the Bayview Campus) and London headquarters are evidence that Google values proximity.

DH: Do you think your amazement that Google is investing so much money in physical space relates to the idea of “engineering serendipity” that you’ve promoted? Are they really able to think in those terms when they’re moving so quickly?

GL: Yes, I think so. One example is Google’s “people analytics” group. The company was prescient enough to create a dedicated data analysis group to study how people in the company actually work. Eventually, most companies will follow suit in molding functions of HR and facilities management to actually manage people and space together as a single unit — or at least they should.

Another responsibility of Google’s people analytics group is to manage social interactions among Googlers. There’s a reason the Googleplex has a bee-keeping club, and it’s not to keep employees at the ‘Plex 20 hours a day, which is how such programs are typically seen from the outside. Instead, they’re trying to figure out how to mix employees in unforeseen combinations that go beyond corporate roles and politics.

I’ve seen the chronic coffee machine and water cooler metaphors come up frequently in this context. When companies try to figure out how to increase workforce cohesion or introduce people, the solution is invariably adding or moving the coffee machine around. After all this time, we seem to have no better idea for bringing people together than to leave food lying around the office kitchen, as if you were trying to attract a pack of wild animals. I’d be curious to track the people analytics group’s results, which may suggest new social modes for bringing people together.

The third example is Campus London, where Google has stacked an incubator, an accelerator, and two floors of co-working beneath a satellite office on the top floor. Google’s presence is the draw for the entrepreneurs who work there, while the appeal for Google is this hive of activity beneath them they can keep tabs on, learn from, and hire from. I think this is an interesting lesson for companies — especially considering we talk all the time about the benefits of industry clusters. Though the work clusters may not be competitive, they’re close enough to drive innovation.

DH: You also mentioned Facebook at the IIDA event, describing how Zuckerberg was very vocal in the design process with Gehry. How does Facebook measure up in the world of companies growing so quickly when they’re the ones driving the design of their workplace?

GL: I don’t think this makes Facebook much of an outlier since I imagine Google gave NBBJ a lot of input. Facebook is evolving, hiring, and adding new functions so quickly that the company believes it must be able to spawn out a whole new product group at a moment’s notice. The result is that it’s very reluctant to conform to planted physical space. Instead, they’ll just mount work surfaces on castors so they can rearrange the space as necessary. I think this is: A. Really interesting, B. It’s similar to the urban dynamic I write about, which describes why cities work so well, and C. If I were an architect it would scare the hell out of me because they’re basically saying, “You can’t figure us out. You can’t design spaces for us that morph as quickly as we need them to, so just give us a big box.”

DH: We’ve seen sit-to-stand workstations established as a standard in Scandinavian countries and other parts of Europe at a rapid pace. In the US, however, that’s been lagging. Recently, Innovant has seen a surge in requests for adjustable height desks. Do you think this notion of adapting our workplaces for health and safety reasons is a real and sustainable shift, or is it just a trend?

GL: I don’t have informed opinion on this, though I would say yes. I think it’s a real trend, which is part of the larger notion of choice and the awareness that people no longer have to sit in an uncomfortable chair at an uncomfortable desk. Instead, they’re demanding a range of motions and a range of environments for work.

As Nilofer Merchant put it, “Sitting is the smoking of our generation.” I’ll be curious to see whether this achieves the status of a crusade, though it will be hard to trace its origins since there seems to be a greater acceptance of design and choice in the US. I certainly think the desire for public space and a range of motions at one’s desk are a part of a larger trend.

DH: Based on what you know about how work is changing, how do you envision the workplace of the future?

GL: The key is that it’s not just a workplace. The workplace of the future is merged intimately with the other environments around it. You’ll have environments that exist either to put your head down and work alone, or you’ll be involved in socializing; either you’re plugged into the cloud or you’re really involved in physical space with people while executing multiple work modes at once.

The workplace of the future won’t start by walking into an elevator lobby or parking your car outside a suburban office complex and going inside to sit at a desk, where there’s nothing but desks and there’s nothing but work. I imagine the street intersecting with the building, so that the moment blurs when you walk into the office out of what today would be a coffee shop, restaurant or retail complex.

The people you’re working with are not necessarily your professional colleagues. You chose that space because it’s designed for the kind of work you want to do and it houses the kind of people you need to work with (or not work with). I imagine you won’t necessarily be choosing where and how you work based on who is paying you. Instead, you’ll base your decision on a space’s relevant functions, which will blend with the city somehow.

The word I keep coming back to is permeability. We need to break open the walls of the office to allow other elements in. This will allow the office to leak out into the city and the city to leak into the office. I think the next step is to determine exactly how that looks. We’ve begun talking about multiple environments in a workplace, but when we take that further, the discussion will be about the environments of the city and vice versa.

DH: What I find most exciting about your vision is the notion of choice –

GL: Exactly! Choice, something we don’t normally associate with going to work.

DH: Right, it’s empowering to think that someday we’ll have the choice to flow throughout the office (or even out of it) in an attempt to find the right workspace.

GL: I don’t think this change will come because employers are more enlightened, which is what we’re seeing with technology companies now. Anybody who’s involved in knowledge work knows what it takes to come up with good ideas. What makes a good working environment on paper is a diversity of opinions and backgrounds, a certain environment, and a certain mental mindset to even be able to think warm thoughts and come up with good ideas. Employers are going to give you the flexibility of choice so they can better harness your work, not because they’re warm and fuzzy. They simply want the best work from you.

DH: What will it take to convince employers that giving employees the flexibility of choice will produce the best work?

GL: Everything I’ve said so far is a mix of anecdotes and hypotheses. The real question is whether we can test any of this — what new styles of work, collaboration, and organization are emerging in cities? What kind of environments will be disrupted by these shifts?  What solo- vs. group work patterns exist, how are they evolving, and how can they be mapped, understood and enhanced? How can new ways of organizing work in cities make people more creative, productive and happy? And what are the benefits of doing so— better retention rates? Higher productivity? Greater innovation? And how do we measure any of this?

I’m putting together a team of architects, data scientists and researchers to explore some of these questions. I’ll let you know when we have some answers.

Part One: Greg Lindsay on the Future of the Workplace

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Earlier this summer, the marketing team attended an IIDANY Facilities Forum focused on the topic, “The Evolving Workplace: Change or Adapt?” Moderated by David Craig, Associate Principal at Cannon Design, the discussion featured insights on the evolving workplace and what this means for our industry from two workplace innovators, Greg Lindsay, Contributing Writer for Fast Company, and Bart Higgins, Director at ?What If!

We were particularly excited to hear from Greg as we had posted his New York Times article, “Engineering Serendipity,” on our blog. This post summarized Greg’s commentary on workplace policies by the likes of Yahoo! and Google, describing how a company can boost employee creativity and productivity by engineering social interactions.

Greg agreed to elaborate on some of his ideas for our blog, including explorations into what he calls “the blurring of the office and the city.” Read on for his insights into 21st century ways of work and places for work.

Deborah Herr: Gensler’s recent survey effectively pointed the finger at open plan environments for declining workplace effectiveness. Are you noticing a looming shift away from open plan or seeing any real trends that address these complaints?

Greg Lindsay: The open plan office is never going to go away, just like the cubicle is never going to go away. But what I find most interesting is the recognition that one size does not fit all. In the ongoing quest to squeeze every good idea and every last bit of productivity out of people, we’ve realized that working at one, generic environment for 8 or 10 hours a day is ineffective. Instead, we need to physically mode switch on a moment to moment basis to glean every last bit of efficiency out of people.

DH: Speaking of these modes, have there been any suggestions about what the “right” ratio would be for these modes? Is there a certain balance of “we” and “me” spaces that we should aim for in a single workplace?

GL: That‘s the $64 billion question. You’ve highlighted the absurdity of someone, somehow publishing research with the “right” ratio based on the number of hours we collaborate. Though it probably won’t be right, we will convince ourselves that it’s right enough.

I imagine the companies that try to do this are going to end up going in two directions. Either they’re going to oversimplify it and get an office with one really intense environment and one really collaborative one. Or, they’ll have eight different work modes in a single office. In this case, the office becomes a fantasy land of different working types, which I would imagine is good for sales, but difficult for most companies to implement. This is why I’m personally more interested in work and city relationships. This would involve encouraging people to leave the office to find different work modes and in the course of that discover something new – whether it be a new idea or new people.

Ultimately, I think the larger notion of “the office” is reaching its functional limits. The struggle to come up with new ideas, push faster and move farther has exposed us to these limitations. The innovation we strive for requires face-to-face, high bandwidth communication, but we still try to do it in an environment where you see the same people day after day. These two trends are in inevitable conflict.

DH: The idea of the office reaching its limitations would alarm a lot of people in my industry. We will have to wait and see, but I can hardly imagine the day when someone may say, “You don’t need to be sitting at your desk for me to realize that you’re being productive.”

GL: Well, it’s a question of, “What is your desk?” I don’t think the desk will ever go away. Desks will be around as long as we’re typing on a device. Instead, it becomes a question of, “What is your desk that is not your desk at your employer?” I think this question will lead us to all sorts of fascinating answers – it will be a desk at someone else’s office, or a temporary desk in a co-working space. Rather than choosing between two or seven environments in one office, you might have two or three environments in your employer’s office with multiple workspaces located across the city. It will be interesting to see how this network of workspaces evolves, which is separate from the ongoing design evolution of desks and chairs.

To me, the more interesting question of what should alarm Innovant is the notion that people find the office to be so ineffective that they’re willing to take their laptops and work in sub-optimal conditions just because they can. If people are willing to shed the productivity-enhancing elements of the office in favor of choice, we are failing them somehow. Perhaps we need to balance this by designing better environments for work outside of the designated office.

DH: You’ve mentioned technology as having a significant role in the evolving workplace. This was obvious at NeoCon 2013 where a lot of big industry players focused on technology as a way to mitigate some of the problems of open plan environments. What sorts of tools or technology do you see contributing to workplace effectiveness?

GL: One longstanding problem that people are interested in solving is the need for systems that track employees down when they’ve been encouraged to wander. I’m dubious that furniture or office equipment makers will be able to design software that can iterate fast enough or function as well as the offerings from software companies.

This is why I’m interested in the potential use of social networking or GPS tracking systems to figure out who’s nearby. At some point, I imagine that as a function of employment we’ll all have an employee badge app on our phones or we’ll wear badges that contain these functions. A recent New York Times story described retailers using smartphones to track people’s movements through their stores. Eventually, we’ll do the same for the office – or we should. Once you do that, you can perform all sorts of interesting big data analysis of who’s actually working and where. I imagine that this would be the grail for a lot of companies since the org chart is the barest approximation of who’s actually working together. Once you understand what’s really going on, you can start rearranging the office in real time. It will be interesting to see how an office manager of the future might intervene on the fabric of an office to either support employees or shake things up a bit.

Please check back for “Part Two” of this interview, which will be posted next week.

Expert Series: Simplify Your (Work) Life

by Rocky Lotito, Account Executive

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The first week of August marks “Simplify Your Life Week,” a time for us to reevaluate our lifestyles, habits, and environments in order to rid ourselves of clutter. Doing away with needless items and time-consuming busywork frees up both physical and mental space for the things that are most important. This kind of prioritizing is vital in the workplace, where minutiae can pile up faster than we can get rid of it unless we take the initiative to organize (read: simplify) our lives.

With this in mind, Innovant provides several methods for office-life simplification, including:

Cable Management: Innovant’s sophisticated cable management system not only hides unsightly, spaghetti-like cables from view, it also provides practical elements for organizing visible cabling. Combinations of grommets, brush strips, and center well cable drops offer users multiple options for cleanly running tabletop cables to hidden power supplies. Desktop power options even allow users to plug in transient items like cell phones and tablets without disrupting permanent cabling for workstation items. This management system allows workstations to maintain an orderly appearance, while also preventing any accidental trips over cords that could endanger workers or accidentally power down critical systems.

Storage: Our clients often seek storage options that don’t occupy too much real estate. Innovant’s storage pedestals fit neatly below workstations for seamless storage integration. Whether static or mobile, these modular storage units provide flexibility that can account for future growth. Worktop storage cubes, which do not require tools for installation or removal, can be easily placed anywhere along a work surface. This provides end-users with dedicated places to store critical items and papers for easy access. Other below-work surface items like bookcases or trash receptacles offer versatile storage solutions to keep workstations free of clutter.

Technology Integration: Innovant desks make it easier than any other brand of furniture for clients to make hardware and cabling changes. IT staff can deftly access the raceway from above through either flip-up panels or slide-out worktops. This means staff can make major technology adjustments without ever having to get their knees dirty. Additionally, the generous size of our raceway provides maximum flexibility for mounting and arranging devices. This ensures that there is no mess within the frame, rendering neat and effective IT planning permanently viable.

Center Well Accessories: Placing accessories in the center well also helps keep workstations neat and orderly. These accessories eliminate the need for workers to bring their own gadgets, which disrupts workplace uniformity. Options include center well task lights that come in a variety of forms and finishes, all of which integrate seamlessly into the raceway. We also offer several power units, including a flush-mounted unit that can pop open for use or snap closed when not in use. Finally, though the pencil tray infill is a simple item, it provides users a place to corral pens, pencils, markers, etc., all of which tend to be the most likely culprits of desktop clutter.

By incorporating such features into our products, Innovant has successfully tailored its workstations for countless clients, which helps ensure employee productivity.

Workplace Environmental Strategy and Branding   Over the past 13 years, the evolution of the workplace environment has gone through a transition. No longer emphasizing privacy and the “my space, your space” syndrome, workplaces now carry the opposite focus. Our sales consultants have worked on a diverse range of environments in a variety of industries. With flexible product lines that have intelligent solutions such as the S4 series, Innovant has been successful in meeting our clients’ specific needs.   The evolution of how people work has been driven by the realization that the user’s role has changed. With a shift towards telecommuting and co-working, workplace strategies require flexibility in their spaces to perform well. Being in an enclosed, restrictive space does not promote collaboration in the office, in or out. In order to increase motivation and promote growth, having an open environment in which to work allows this natural progression to evolve, which then enables creativity and yields a more productive workforce.   Companies today, whether consolidating or relocating, go through the process of evaluating their brand presence and corporate culture. They look for ways to modernize their image both inside and out. Your future workplace strategy should be designed to attract and retain the most talented people, and a corporation’s physical environment is an important aspect of employees’ success and output.

Workplace Environmental Strategy and Branding

Over the past 13 years, the evolution of the workplace environment has gone through a transition. No longer emphasizing privacy and the “my space, your space” syndrome, workplaces now carry the opposite focus. Our sales consultants have worked on a diverse range of environments in a variety of industries. With flexible product lines that have intelligent solutions such as the S4 series, Innovant has been successful in meeting our clients’ specific needs.
 
The evolution of how people work has been driven by the realization that the user’s role has changed. With a shift towards telecommuting and co-working, workplace strategies require flexibility in their spaces to perform well. Being in an enclosed, restrictive space does not promote collaboration in the office, in or out. In order to increase motivation and promote growth, having an open environment in which to work allows this natural progression to evolve, which then enables creativity and yields a more productive workforce.
 
Companies today, whether consolidating or relocating, go through the process of evaluating their brand presence and corporate culture. They look for ways to modernize their image both inside and out. Your future workplace strategy should be designed to attract and retain the most talented people, and a corporation’s physical environment is an important aspect of employees’ success and output.

Trading Places - Seminar with Charles Braham, Joe Du Temple, and Charlie Du Temple Monday June 11th 1 - 2pm  
 We are excited to annouce that Charles Braham, President of Innovant Inc., will be speaking at Neocon. He will be accompanying panel members Joe and Charlie Du Temple of ESD Global in addressing the impact of high density technology on space design and construction. They will also discuss how to accommodate technology within and above a desk while insuring that the mechanical infrastructure and ergonomic requirements are met. 
 The attendees will gain a knowledge on trading desk - open plan design and how it relates to accommodating an extensive list of technology requirements. They will also gain an understanding of how to best position the process of ‘desk’ design into a project, and finally what team disciplines are needed to make the project a success.

Trading Places - Seminar with Charles Braham, Joe Du Temple, and Charlie Du Temple Monday June 11th 1 - 2pm

We are excited to annouce that Charles Braham, President of Innovant Inc., will be speaking at Neocon. He will be accompanying panel members Joe and Charlie Du Temple of ESD Global in addressing the impact of high density technology on space design and construction. They will also discuss how to accommodate technology within and above a desk while insuring that the mechanical infrastructure and ergonomic requirements are met.

The attendees will gain a knowledge on trading desk - open plan design and how it relates to accommodating an extensive list of technology requirements. They will also gain an understanding of how to best position the process of ‘desk’ design into a project, and finally what team disciplines are needed to make the project a success.

Featured in this Month's Issue of Interiors & Sources

Featured in this month’s issue of Interiors & Sources

“Conference tables from Innovant are ideal for outfitting larger offices when combined with the company’s FORm_office system. From technology-rich touchdown tables to traditional conferencing, the Innovant conference line features a full complement of user-accessible services and advanced cable management tools. Access to power, data, video and USB ports is provided by flush-mount, pop-up and fully recessed ports in the center, and a variety of table sizes and finishes are available. ”


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TRADING PLACES

Join ESD’s Joe Du Temple and Charlie Du Temple, in the Innovant Showroom for an AIA Continuing Education Class that addresses how seemingly small decisions involving technology direction can have a significant impact on design and constructability. Using trading fi rms as an example, the class reviews deployed technologies and how they drive MEP systems, construction and space planning.

Hosted by Innovant, the evening promises to be interesting and educational. Whether you are a veteran trading fi rm designer experienced with the unique requirements of trading fi rms or are becoming familiar with these cutting edge environments, this class provides background and fresh insight.

RSVP to Laura Finn at lfinn@esdglobal.com 312  456  2312

Innovant Showroom is Located at 440 N. Wells, Suite 310  Chicago IL 60654  

ph 646 368 6254

Download the Invitation>

FORm Review from Wille Design

“For a recent client located in the San Francisco area, we provided the Form product for their command and control centers and in their training area. Form was the right fit for their complexity and ability to manage change over the long term. After the installation was complete, the customer, of their own initiative, expanded the extent of product and areas to receive Innovant’s Form product. I think that speaks for itself. The customer’s IT services team were also extremely impressed with the accessibility and ease of integrating their technology requirements within the consoles. Innovant’s consoles have now been successfully installed in several of facilities with very positive reception in all instances." Read More>

- Robin Wille, LEED AP, President at Wille Design

Learn more about FORm >

Learn about Wille Design >

S4 Installation in California

FORm_office S4 Installation - Redwood California 

Innovant recently installed Form Office S4 benching system for YuMe Video Ad Network in Redwood. Founded by Jayant Kadambi and Ayyappan Sankari in 2004, YuMe is one of the most innovative leaders in the field of video advertising, directing campaigns for Mini Cooper, Wells Fargo and eBay. Their headquarters are in Redwood City, California, and with sales offices throughout the United States in addition to the European headquarters in London.

Our award winning S4 Form Office benching system elegant and modern complements the urban interior of this unique office environment. The exposed brick walls and the wood beam ceiling are the perfect match for the modern and contemporary Form Office S4 benching system. Its contemporary design, advanced technology and cable management provides creatives with an optimal workstation. Each desk is outfitted with privacy panels, personal storage cubes and data/usb ports for the user’s convenience. Form Office S4 is in a class of its own, perfect for collaborative or ‘touchdown’ spaces like YuMe’s offices are. Furniture that makes for a creative and collaborative environment can also empower your staff by granting new modes of expression. Devoting space that allows this is important, but furniture designed to promote collaboration greatly increases productivity. This is the great contribution that Form Office S4 offers to all creatives of YuMe’s offices, encouraging them to share their ideas and creating a collaborative work environment.

Form Office S4 installation in Redwood has been possible thanks to the full-service dealership Inside Source, which offers office furniture and services to customers throughout the San Francisco and greater Bay Area. They help companies achieve their goals faster and more reliably providing a complete menu of services, including project management, space planning, warehousing and installation.

Interested in S4? Email info@innovant.com for more information 

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Apple Design

Apple Design Book Review - Giulia Trombin

Featuring over two hundred examples of designs, the Apple Design book focuses on Jonathan Ive, Senior Vice President of Industrial Design for Apple, who since 1996 has been responsible for leading a design team widely regarded as one of the world’s best. Over the past decade, Ive and his team of designers wrote electronics design history with their standard-setting iMacs, iPhones, iPods, and iPads.  Examining each of these in detail, and with full color throughout, Apple Design compares various approaches to industrial design alongside Apple’s, and casts light on numerous aspects of its history, deepening our understanding of contemporary industrial design. Six of Ive’s works, including the original iPod, are even part of the collection at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Following an analysis of the forms and functions of the featured products, the book provides an explanation of the innovative production methods and materials applied.

 Design is a funny word” says Steve Jobs “Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really how it works. The design of the Mac wasn’t what it looked like, although that was part of it. Primarily, it was how it worked”. With an Ive product, it is impossible to say where the engineering ends and the ‘design’ begins.

The book is available on Amazon via pre-order, and will be released on November 30. pre-order >