Posts tagged new workplace
CoreNet NYC 2013 Golf Outing

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This year, Innovant’s Vice President of Sales, Bob Driscoll, teamed up with our A&D Marketing Representative, Hayley Willson, to participate in a foursome that played at Century Country Club for CoreNet’s Annual Golf Outing. We asked Bob to dish on the event that took place Monday, July 15 at both Century and Old Oaks Country Club. See his take on the outing below:

“HOT, HOT, HOT is the best way to describe the recent CoreNet event we attended. The event saw a great turn out, which included NYC marketplace end-users and top people in the Furniture, Construction, and Technology Industries.

Given the heat - 100+ degrees - I expected some cancellations for the golf round, but turnout was so great that the two courses were packed with players. During the round, they held the usual contests - longest drive, closest to pin, low net, and low gross. We came up empty, but it was all for a really good cause, helping build homes for our injured soldiers.

We hosted clients in our foursome and the feedback we received from them was both a very nice "thank you” and a “let’s do it again.” We all had a very good time. 

After golf, we gathered for a refreshing cocktail and dinner reception.  Hayley and Bruce Wells, Innovant’s Director of Marketing & Development, enjoyed connecting with a lot of new people as both recently joined CoreNet. We all considered the day a great success.“   

Open Spaces Make for a Productive Workplace    
    In a recent  New York Times  article, “ Looking for a Lesson in Google’s Perks ,” author James B. Stewart recounts his colorful experience touring Google’s East Coast headquarters. His, “at times, dizzying excursion through a labyrinth of play areas; cafes, coffee bars and open kitchens; sunny outdoor terraces with chaises; gourmet cafeterias… [and] Broadway-themed conference rooms with velvet drapes…” served as an attempt to discern whether Google’s imaginative workplaces are responsible for the creativity and productivity of its employees.    
  One of Stewart’s observations about the  Google  offices particularly resonated with our team at Innovant: the open plan environment serves as the physical platform for Google’s intellectual advancements. In the article, Craig Nevill-Manning, “  a New Zealand native and Google’s engineering director in Manhattan,” explains the philosophy behind Google’s office environment.      “Google’s success depends on innovation and collaboration. Everything we did was geared toward making it easy to talk. Being on one floor here removed psychological barriers to interacting, and we’ve tried to preserve that.”   
  After his Google expedition, Stewart conferred with Teresa Amabile, “  a business administration professor at Harvard Business School and co-author of “The Progress Principle,” about creativity at work.” What he learned from Amabile was that    “there’s some evidence that great physical space enhances creativity.”    She added that,  “the theory is that open spaces that are fun, where people want to be, facilitate idea exchange. I’ve watched people interact at Google and you see a cross-fertilization of ideas.”    
  Another expert, Ben Waber, “who has a Ph.D. from M.I.T. and is the author of “People Analytics,” weighed in on workplace interactions.  “Google has really been out front in this field,” he said. “They’ve looked at the data to see how people are collaborating. Physical space is the biggest lever to encourage collaboration. And the data are clear that the biggest driver of performance in complex industries like software is serendipitous interaction. For this to happen, you also need to shape a community. That means if you’re stressed, there’s someone to help, to take up the slack. If you’re surrounded by friends, you’re happier, you’re more loyal, you’re more productive. Google looks at this holistically. It’s the antithesis of the old factory model, where people were just cogs in a machine.”   
  At Innovant, we understand Waber’s point that “physical space is the biggest lever to… collaboration.” For employees to thrive, employers must invest in an environment that breeds productivity and creativity. This type of investment in the workplace is sure to be an investment in the work that’s completed there.   

Open Spaces Make for a Productive Workplace

In a recent New York Times article, “Looking for a Lesson in Google’s Perks,” author James B. Stewart recounts his colorful experience touring Google’s East Coast headquarters. His, “at times, dizzying excursion through a labyrinth of play areas; cafes, coffee bars and open kitchens; sunny outdoor terraces with chaises; gourmet cafeterias… [and] Broadway-themed conference rooms with velvet drapes…” served as an attempt to discern whether Google’s imaginative workplaces are responsible for the creativity and productivity of its employees.

One of Stewart’s observations about the Google offices particularly resonated with our team at Innovant: the open plan environment serves as the physical platform for Google’s intellectual advancements. In the article, Craig Nevill-Manning, “a New Zealand native and Google’s engineering director in Manhattan,” explains the philosophy behind Google’s office environment. “Google’s success depends on innovation and collaboration. Everything we did was geared toward making it easy to talk. Being on one floor here removed psychological barriers to interacting, and we’ve tried to preserve that.”

After his Google expedition, Stewart conferred with Teresa Amabile, “a business administration professor at Harvard Business School and co-author of “The Progress Principle,” about creativity at work.” What he learned from Amabile was that “there’s some evidence that great physical space enhances creativity.” She added that, “the theory is that open spaces that are fun, where people want to be, facilitate idea exchange. I’ve watched people interact at Google and you see a cross-fertilization of ideas.”

Another expert, Ben Waber, “who has a Ph.D. from M.I.T. and is the author of “People Analytics,” weighed in on workplace interactions. “Google has really been out front in this field,” he said. “They’ve looked at the data to see how people are collaborating. Physical space is the biggest lever to encourage collaboration. And the data are clear that the biggest driver of performance in complex industries like software is serendipitous interaction. For this to happen, you also need to shape a community. That means if you’re stressed, there’s someone to help, to take up the slack. If you’re surrounded by friends, you’re happier, you’re more loyal, you’re more productive. Google looks at this holistically. It’s the antithesis of the old factory model, where people were just cogs in a machine.”

At Innovant, we understand Waber’s point that “physical space is the biggest lever to… collaboration.” For employees to thrive, employers must invest in an environment that breeds productivity and creativity. This type of investment in the workplace is sure to be an investment in the work that’s completed there.  

Evolution and Impact of STEEL

Thank you Arch Daily for this amazing infographic about the Impacts of Steel.

“One of the most important milestones in architecture was the development of construction methods in iron and steel. With these methods we have been able to construct stronger and taller structures, while using less materials. The evolution of steel frame construction in the 20th century entirely changed the concept of wall and the support.”

Innovant’s FORm products have a steel structure made up of over 25% post-industrial recycled content. By using a strong frame work our products are able to live multiple lifecycles and reused in new offices, before being disassembled and recycled. 

As seen on ArchDaily.com - Visit the original post.